Subdial Curated

Rolex Daytona Everose 116515LN

£31,975
Rolex's Daytona might be one of the 'hottest' watches on the market today, but this wasn't always the case. The watch started out as the 'Cosmograph', seemingly named to coincide with NASA's efforts to explore the frontiers of space. Alas, Omega's Speedmaster won out and became the Moonwatch, lea... More

Rolex's Daytona might be one of the 'hottest' watches on the market today, but this wasn't always the case. The watch started out as the 'Cosmograph', seemingly named to coincide with NASA's efforts to explore the frontiers of space. Alas, Omega's Speedmaster won out and became the Moonwatch, leaving Rolex's new watch lacking a sense of purpose.

It wasn't until 1964 when Rolex rebranded the chronograph by associating it with the Daytona International Speedway, making the watch a racecar driver's tool. Even still, it never enjoyed much success until Rolex once again rebranded in the late 1980s, giving the Daytona a polished bezel and new dial that gave the watch a much more contemporary and luxurious feel. As the new watch grew in popularity, so did Rolex's vintage models. Today, both new and old alike are highly sought-after, with collectors appreciating the history as well as design of the now-iconic watch.

ROLEX

Known by many simply as "the Crown", Rolex has certainly done much to deserve its reputation. From its founding just over a century ago by a German immigrant in the UK, Rolex has grown to become an international behemoth, recognisable (and indeed visible) across the globe.

Few other watchmakers can boast the same combination of consistency, quality and desirability as Rolex. Everything from the build quality of the cases and bracelets to the chronometer-rated movements are designed to ensure that even the most discerning of owners are satisfied.

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Rolex's Daytona might be one of the 'hottest' watches on the market today, but this wasn't always the case. The watch started out as the 'Cosmograph', seemingly named to coincide with NASA's efforts to explore the frontiers of space. Alas, Omega's Speedmaster won out and became the Moonwatch, leaving Rolex's new watch lacking a sense of purpose.

It wasn't until 1964 when Rolex rebranded the chronograph by associating it with the Daytona International Speedway, making the watch a racecar driver's tool. Even still, it never enjoyed much success until Rolex once again rebranded in the late 1980s, giving the Daytona a polished bezel and new dial that gave the watch a much more contemporary and luxurious feel. As the new watch grew in popularity, so did Rolex's vintage models. Today, both new and old alike are highly sought-after, with collectors appreciating the history as well as design of the now-iconic watch.

ROLEX

Known by many simply as "the Crown", Rolex has certainly done much to deserve its reputation. From its founding just over a century ago by a German immigrant in the UK, Rolex has grown to become an international behemoth, recognisable (and indeed visible) across the globe.

Few other watchmakers can boast the same combination of consistency, quality and desirability as Rolex. Everything from the build quality of the cases and bracelets to the chronometer-rated movements are designed to ensure that even the most discerning of owners are satisfied.

As part of our commitment to transparency, we're showing you this watch on our timegrapher. Testing is done in six positions, covering how the watch is worn in daily use.

Timegraphers listen to the ticks which a movement make. Professional machines like ours can take more measurements, create a graph, and support more escapement types.

"Accuracy" refers to how many seconds a movement gains or loses each day. COSC standards require -4/+6 seconds a day, while vintage watches may read closer to -60/+60s.

"Amplitude" tells you how much the balance wheel is moving each rotation. Certain escapements have a higher amplitude, while some will have a lower value by default. A below-average reading for your watch's escapement suggests there is friction in the movement from a lack of lubrication.

"Beat error" is an indication of the alignment between the timekeeping components. In modern watches, a reading under to 1.0ms should be expected, while vintage watches may have a reading of up to 3.0ms.

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