Subdial Curated

Patek Philippe World Time White Gold 5130G

£34,500
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The first ever World Time movement was created by Louis Cottier in 1931. Patek Philippe was among the first to adopt his mechanism, adding a World Time complication to its offerings in 1937. Fast forward to today, the Cottier World Time complication is largely unchanged. It still displays informa... More

The first ever World Time movement was created by Louis Cottier in 1931. Patek Philippe was among the first to adopt his mechanism, adding a World Time complication to its offerings in 1937.

Fast forward to today, the Cottier World Time complication is largely unchanged. It still displays information through a rotating 24-hour disk with various cities and timezones, and looks largely the same. It shows that once achieved, perfection is hard to top.

PATEK PHILIPPE

To many, Patek Philippe is the epitome of the high-end watchmaker. Throughout its nearly two centuries' of existence, it has weathered everything from the World Wars to the Quartz Crisis of the 1980s. Even today, it's widely acknowledged to be amongst the most successful and prestigious watchmakers, with its creations gracing wrists of everyone from bankers and politicians to rappers and actors.

Patek Philippe began its life as Patek, Czapek & Cie. in 1839 and made its name by making some of the most accurate watch movements. By the turn of the century, Patek was venturing into the realm of high complications, including split-seconds chronographs, perpetual calendars, and minute repeaters. The latter made it into wristwatch-form in 1924 as a piece unique for Ralph Teetor, the inventor of the cruise control function.

In 1932, the company ownership changed hands to the Stern family, who still run Patek Philippe. In that same year, the Calatrava wristwatch was introduced. By the 1970s, seeing the damage which the Quartz Crisis had done to the industry, Patek Philippe decided to introduce a bold new steel watch. Thus, the Nautilus was born.

Since then, the company has gone from strength to strength, solidifying its reputation as one of the finest Swiss watchmakers. From the highly-desirable stainless steel sports watches, to the famed high complications, down to the "humble" Calatrava, Patek Philippe proves that it can do it all.

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The first ever World Time movement was created by Louis Cottier in 1931. Patek Philippe was among the first to adopt his mechanism, adding a World Time complication to its offerings in 1937.

Fast forward to today, the Cottier World Time complication is largely unchanged. It still displays information through a rotating 24-hour disk with various cities and timezones, and looks largely the same. It shows that once achieved, perfection is hard to top.

PATEK PHILIPPE

To many, Patek Philippe is the epitome of the high-end watchmaker. Throughout its nearly two centuries' of existence, it has weathered everything from the World Wars to the Quartz Crisis of the 1980s. Even today, it's widely acknowledged to be amongst the most successful and prestigious watchmakers, with its creations gracing wrists of everyone from bankers and politicians to rappers and actors.

Patek Philippe began its life as Patek, Czapek & Cie. in 1839 and made its name by making some of the most accurate watch movements. By the turn of the century, Patek was venturing into the realm of high complications, including split-seconds chronographs, perpetual calendars, and minute repeaters. The latter made it into wristwatch-form in 1924 as a piece unique for Ralph Teetor, the inventor of the cruise control function.

In 1932, the company ownership changed hands to the Stern family, who still run Patek Philippe. In that same year, the Calatrava wristwatch was introduced. By the 1970s, seeing the damage which the Quartz Crisis had done to the industry, Patek Philippe decided to introduce a bold new steel watch. Thus, the Nautilus was born.

Since then, the company has gone from strength to strength, solidifying its reputation as one of the finest Swiss watchmakers. From the highly-desirable stainless steel sports watches, to the famed high complications, down to the "humble" Calatrava, Patek Philippe proves that it can do it all.

As part of our commitment to transparency, we're showing you this watch on our timegrapher. Testing is done in six positions, covering how the watch is worn in daily use.

Timegraphers listen to the ticks which a movement make. Professional machines like ours can take more measurements, create a graph, and support more escapement types.

"Accuracy" refers to how many seconds a movement gains or loses each day. COSC standards require -4/+6 seconds a day, while vintage watches may read closer to -60/+60s.

"Amplitude" tells you how much the balance wheel is moving each rotation. Certain escapements have a higher amplitude, while some will have a lower value by default. A below-average reading for your watch's escapement suggests there is friction in the movement from a lack of lubrication.

"Beat error" is an indication of the alignment between the timekeeping components. In modern watches, a reading under to 1.0ms should be expected, while vintage watches may have a reading of up to 3.0ms.

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