Subdial Curated

Patek Philippe Neptune Stainless Steel 'Tiffany Dial' 5080/1A

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This Patek Philippe features the vaunted 'Tiffany & Co' stamp given to watches sold through the New York jeweller. While originally a subtle addition to the dial, the Tiffany stamp has grown to become a marker of rarity, and with it, prices. Nevertheless, the stamp turns an already-beautiful ... More

This Patek Philippe features the vaunted 'Tiffany & Co' stamp given to watches sold through the New York jeweller. While originally a subtle addition to the dial, the Tiffany stamp has grown to become a marker of rarity, and with it, prices. Nevertheless, the stamp turns an already-beautiful watch into something extraordinary.
The Neptune, despite being a stainless steel Patek Philippe with an integrated bracelet, is a relatively unknown reference. Much like the Aquanaut and Nautilus, the Neptune features an eye-catching design and a name evocative of the sea.
 The bracelet, while not having the rugged luxury of the Nautilus bracelet, is more elegant and glamorous with its polished links. The round case features a pair of distinctive crown guards as well as a dial which offers applied Roman numerals at 3-6-9 and a printed minute track for a slightly eccentric appearance.

PATEK PHILIPPE
To many, Patek Philippe is the epitome of the high-end watchmaker. Throughout its nearly two centuries' of existence, it has weathered everything from the World Wars to the Quartz Crisis of the 1980s. Even today, it's widely acknowledged to be amongst the most successful and prestigious watchmakers, with its creations gracing wrists of everyone from bankers and politicians to rappers and actors.
Patek Philippe began its life as Patek, Czapek & Cie. in 1839 and made its name by making some of the most accurate watch movements. By the turn of the century, Patek was venturing into the realm of high complications, including split-seconds chronographs, perpetual calendars, and minute repeaters. The latter made it into wristwatch-form in 1924 as a piece unique for Ralph Teetor, the inventor of the cruise control function.
 In 1932, the company ownership changed hands to the Stern family, who still run Patek Philippe. In that same year, the Calatrava wristwatch was introduced. By the 1970s, seeing the damage which the Quartz Crisis had done to the industry, Patek Philippe decided to introduce a bold new steel watch. Thus, the Nautilus was born.

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This Patek Philippe features the vaunted 'Tiffany & Co' stamp given to watches sold through the New York jeweller. While originally a subtle addition to the dial, the Tiffany stamp has grown to become a marker of rarity, and with it, prices. Nevertheless, the stamp turns an already-beautiful watch into something extraordinary.
The Neptune, despite being a stainless steel Patek Philippe with an integrated bracelet, is a relatively unknown reference. Much like the Aquanaut and Nautilus, the Neptune features an eye-catching design and a name evocative of the sea.
 The bracelet, while not having the rugged luxury of the Nautilus bracelet, is more elegant and glamorous with its polished links. The round case features a pair of distinctive crown guards as well as a dial which offers applied Roman numerals at 3-6-9 and a printed minute track for a slightly eccentric appearance.

PATEK PHILIPPE
To many, Patek Philippe is the epitome of the high-end watchmaker. Throughout its nearly two centuries' of existence, it has weathered everything from the World Wars to the Quartz Crisis of the 1980s. Even today, it's widely acknowledged to be amongst the most successful and prestigious watchmakers, with its creations gracing wrists of everyone from bankers and politicians to rappers and actors.
Patek Philippe began its life as Patek, Czapek & Cie. in 1839 and made its name by making some of the most accurate watch movements. By the turn of the century, Patek was venturing into the realm of high complications, including split-seconds chronographs, perpetual calendars, and minute repeaters. The latter made it into wristwatch-form in 1924 as a piece unique for Ralph Teetor, the inventor of the cruise control function.
 In 1932, the company ownership changed hands to the Stern family, who still run Patek Philippe. In that same year, the Calatrava wristwatch was introduced. By the 1970s, seeing the damage which the Quartz Crisis had done to the industry, Patek Philippe decided to introduce a bold new steel watch. Thus, the Nautilus was born.

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