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Omega Speedmaster Snoopy 50th Anniversary 310.32.42.50.02.001

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The Silver Snoopy is a NASA award given to personnel and suppliers who have contributed towards the success of a mission. Omega was given this award in 1970 in recognition of its role in providing reliable timepieces for use by NASA astronauts, most notably during the near-disastrous Apollo 13 mi... More

The Silver Snoopy is a NASA award given to personnel and suppliers who have contributed towards the success of a mission. Omega was given this award in 1970 in recognition of its role in providing reliable timepieces for use by NASA astronauts, most notably during the near-disastrous Apollo 13 mission, where the watch was crucial to timing the manual activation of a propulsion system that corrected the course of the lunar module.

To commemorate the 50th Anniversary of being given this award, Omega released this watch. It features the new cal. 3861, which adds a co-axial escapement to the movement. Invented by the legendary English watchmaker George Daniels, the co-axial escapement drastically decreases friction in the escapement, reducing the amount of wear the parts experience.

OMEGA

Omega is in the unique position of being perhaps the most versatile out of all the watchmakers currently still in operation. Its product lineup includes dive watches, automatic and manual chronographs, as well haute joaillerie works of art. The brand has even demonstrated its high-end watchmaking capabilities by creating complications such as the tourbillon.

Omega's story goes further than just its watches, however. The brand has had a long and rich history of being called upon in times of need, and has sold watches to everyone from the British Royal Flying Corps during the First World War to NASA during the Space Race. More recently, Omega has been known as the exclusive supplier of watches to James Bond.

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The Silver Snoopy is a NASA award given to personnel and suppliers who have contributed towards the success of a mission. Omega was given this award in 1970 in recognition of its role in providing reliable timepieces for use by NASA astronauts, most notably during the near-disastrous Apollo 13 mission, where the watch was crucial to timing the manual activation of a propulsion system that corrected the course of the lunar module.

To commemorate the 50th Anniversary of being given this award, Omega released this watch. It features the new cal. 3861, which adds a co-axial escapement to the movement. Invented by the legendary English watchmaker George Daniels, the co-axial escapement drastically decreases friction in the escapement, reducing the amount of wear the parts experience.

OMEGA

Omega is in the unique position of being perhaps the most versatile out of all the watchmakers currently still in operation. Its product lineup includes dive watches, automatic and manual chronographs, as well haute joaillerie works of art. The brand has even demonstrated its high-end watchmaking capabilities by creating complications such as the tourbillon.

Omega's story goes further than just its watches, however. The brand has had a long and rich history of being called upon in times of need, and has sold watches to everyone from the British Royal Flying Corps during the First World War to NASA during the Space Race. More recently, Omega has been known as the exclusive supplier of watches to James Bond.

As part of our commitment to transparency, we're showing you this watch on our timegrapher. Testing is done in six positions, covering how the watch is worn in daily use.

Timegraphers listen to the ticks which a movement make. Professional machines like ours can take more measurements, create a graph, and support more escapement types.

"Accuracy" refers to how many seconds a movement gains or loses each day. COSC standards require -4/+6 seconds a day, while vintage watches may read closer to -60/+60s.

"Amplitude" tells you how much the balance wheel is moving each rotation. Certain escapements have a higher amplitude, while some will have a lower value by default. A below-average reading for your watch's escapement suggests there is friction in the movement from a lack of lubrication.

"Beat error" is an indication of the alignment between the timekeeping components. In modern watches, a reading under to 1.0ms should be expected, while vintage watches may have a reading of up to 3.0ms.

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