Subdial Curated

Jaeger-LeCoultre Reverso Theo Fennell 276162

£13,250
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Even at a glance, it's clear that this is no ordinary Reverso. While the iconic rotating case and rectangular shape is there, the dial features a striking pink-on-black print. The TF logo at 12 o'clock is none other than the logo of the legendary British jeweller, Theo Fennell. Made as a limited ... More

Even at a glance, it's clear that this is no ordinary Reverso. While the iconic rotating case and rectangular shape is there, the dial features a striking pink-on-black print. The TF logo at 12 o'clock is none other than the logo of the legendary British jeweller, Theo Fennell.

Made as a limited edition of 10, this watch is both extremely rare and aesthetically unique. Created long before the current hype around retailer collaborations, this Reverso was designed without regard to popularity (bright pink isn't exactly the most subtle of colours) but rather to encapsulate the spirit of the brand.

Jaeger-LeCoultre's Reverso is perhaps the most recognisable rectangular watch on the market. Originally released in 1931 to allow polo players to protect their watch while playing by flipping it over. It was marketed to the English and European aristocracy, who would often engrave their coat of arms or personal monograms on the reverse of the case. King Edward VIII had his Royal Crest on his Reverso, while Amelia Earhart's watch had a flightpath between the US East Coast and Mexico.

During the Second World War, the Reverso was retired due to square watches going out of fashion as well as the constraints on materials to be used for non-critical items, such as luxury wristwatches. The Reverso was re-released in 1982, after an Italian distributor discovered a trove of unused cases. Since then, the Reverso has formed the lynchpin of JLC's collection.

JAEGER-LECOULTRE

Jaeger-LeCoultre, also known as JLC, has a rightfully-deserved reputation as the 'watchmaker's watchmaker'. This stems from the fact that in its over 180 years of existence, the company has over 1,200 movements and 400 patents to its name. Even today, many watches still utilise JLC base movements, including the Audemars Piguet 15202.

This watchmaking expertise doesn't mean that the company is limited to making movements for others, however. The brand has also released its fair share of iconic watches, including the Reverso and Memovox.

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Even at a glance, it's clear that this is no ordinary Reverso. While the iconic rotating case and rectangular shape is there, the dial features a striking pink-on-black print. The TF logo at 12 o'clock is none other than the logo of the legendary British jeweller, Theo Fennell.

Made as a limited edition of 10, this watch is both extremely rare and aesthetically unique. Created long before the current hype around retailer collaborations, this Reverso was designed without regard to popularity (bright pink isn't exactly the most subtle of colours) but rather to encapsulate the spirit of the brand.

Jaeger-LeCoultre's Reverso is perhaps the most recognisable rectangular watch on the market. Originally released in 1931 to allow polo players to protect their watch while playing by flipping it over. It was marketed to the English and European aristocracy, who would often engrave their coat of arms or personal monograms on the reverse of the case. King Edward VIII had his Royal Crest on his Reverso, while Amelia Earhart's watch had a flightpath between the US East Coast and Mexico.

During the Second World War, the Reverso was retired due to square watches going out of fashion as well as the constraints on materials to be used for non-critical items, such as luxury wristwatches. The Reverso was re-released in 1982, after an Italian distributor discovered a trove of unused cases. Since then, the Reverso has formed the lynchpin of JLC's collection.

JAEGER-LECOULTRE

Jaeger-LeCoultre, also known as JLC, has a rightfully-deserved reputation as the 'watchmaker's watchmaker'. This stems from the fact that in its over 180 years of existence, the company has over 1,200 movements and 400 patents to its name. Even today, many watches still utilise JLC base movements, including the Audemars Piguet 15202.

This watchmaking expertise doesn't mean that the company is limited to making movements for others, however. The brand has also released its fair share of iconic watches, including the Reverso and Memovox.

As part of our commitment to transparency, we're showing you this watch on our timegrapher. Testing is done in six positions, covering how the watch is worn in daily use.

Timegraphers listen to the ticks which a movement make. Professional machines like ours can take more measurements, create a graph, and support more escapement types.

"Accuracy" refers to how many seconds a movement gains or loses each day. COSC standards require -4/+6 seconds a day, while vintage watches may read closer to -60/+60s.

"Amplitude" tells you how much the balance wheel is moving each rotation. Certain escapements have a higher amplitude, while some will have a lower value by default. A below-average reading for your watch's escapement suggests there is friction in the movement from a lack of lubrication.

"Beat error" is an indication of the alignment between the timekeeping components. In modern watches, a reading under to 1.0ms should be expected, while vintage watches may have a reading of up to 3.0ms.

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