Subdial Curated

H.Moser & Cie Endeavour Perpetual Calendar

£22,975
The Moser Perpetual Calendar is a culmination of Moser's design expertise and unique approach towards aesthetic. At first glance, it looks like a simple time-and-date watch, but the stubby third hand emanating from the central pivot suggests otherwise. It is actually the month indicator, with eac... More

The Moser Perpetual Calendar is a culmination of Moser's design expertise and unique approach towards aesthetic. At first glance, it looks like a simple time-and-date watch, but the stubby third hand emanating from the central pivot suggests otherwise. It is actually the month indicator, with each marker on the dial corresponding to the respective month. The rest of the perpetual calendar's indicators can be found on the reverse, with the leap year indicator taking the form of a wheel.

This watch is an unusual execution of a perpetual calendar mechanism, with its contemporaries often choosing for "more" over "less" in terms of the information on display.

H. MOSER & CIE

H. Moser & Cie was originally founded in the early 19th Century in St. Petersburg, then part of the Russian Empire. It supplied the much of the European monarchies and aristocracy throughout its original iteration, and was re-founded in 2005 by one of Heinrich Moser's grandchildren.

Since its relaunch, the brand has been known both for its high-end watchmaking innovations as well as its eye-catching marketing approach. From making an Apple watch lookalike (its latest version complete with the "loading" icon) to crafting a watch out of Swiss cheese, Moser is no stranger to controversy. At the same time, its horological innovations are undoubtedly significant, including the world's first modular escapement, which eliminates one of the most time-consuming aspects of servicing a watch.

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The Moser Perpetual Calendar is a culmination of Moser's design expertise and unique approach towards aesthetic. At first glance, it looks like a simple time-and-date watch, but the stubby third hand emanating from the central pivot suggests otherwise. It is actually the month indicator, with each marker on the dial corresponding to the respective month. The rest of the perpetual calendar's indicators can be found on the reverse, with the leap year indicator taking the form of a wheel.

This watch is an unusual execution of a perpetual calendar mechanism, with its contemporaries often choosing for "more" over "less" in terms of the information on display.

H. MOSER & CIE

H. Moser & Cie was originally founded in the early 19th Century in St. Petersburg, then part of the Russian Empire. It supplied the much of the European monarchies and aristocracy throughout its original iteration, and was re-founded in 2005 by one of Heinrich Moser's grandchildren.

Since its relaunch, the brand has been known both for its high-end watchmaking innovations as well as its eye-catching marketing approach. From making an Apple watch lookalike (its latest version complete with the "loading" icon) to crafting a watch out of Swiss cheese, Moser is no stranger to controversy. At the same time, its horological innovations are undoubtedly significant, including the world's first modular escapement, which eliminates one of the most time-consuming aspects of servicing a watch.

As part of our commitment to transparency, we're showing you this watch on our timegrapher. Testing is done in six positions, covering how the watch is worn in daily use.

Timegraphers listen to the ticks which a movement make. Professional machines like ours can take more measurements, create a graph, and support more escapement types.

"Accuracy" refers to how many seconds a movement gains or loses each day. COSC standards require -4/+6 seconds a day, while vintage watches may read closer to -60/+60s.

"Amplitude" tells you how much the balance wheel is moving each rotation. Certain escapements have a higher amplitude, while some will have a lower value by default. A below-average reading for your watch's escapement suggests there is friction in the movement from a lack of lubrication.

"Beat error" is an indication of the alignment between the timekeeping components. In modern watches, a reading under to 1.0ms should be expected, while vintage watches may have a reading of up to 3.0ms.

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