Subdial Curated

Bulgari Octo Finissimo 10th Anniversary Limited Edition

£16,975
The Bulgari Octo Finissimo line of ultra thin watches began with the Octo Finissimo Tourbillon, which was at the time the world's thinnest tourbillon movement. Only two years later in 2016, the brand released the world's thinnest minute repeater. Its next release, however, would be the one to pr... More

The Bulgari Octo Finissimo line of ultra thin watches began with the Octo Finissimo Tourbillon, which was at the time the world's thinnest tourbillon movement. Only two years later in 2016, the brand released the world's thinnest minute repeater.

Its next release, however, would be the one to propel the brand into the watchmaking mainstream. In 2017, the Octo Finissimo Automatic, then the world's thinnest automatic watch, was launched. While previous members of the collection were decidedly haute horlogerie (with a price tag to match), this watch retailed at a price that undercut other integrated bracelet watches while offering a genuinely horologically significant timepiece.

BVLGARI

Until very recently, most associated Bulgari solely with fine jewellery. Watchmaking seemed to be a distant second in the brand's list of interest - or it seemed, until the company released the world's thinnest automatic movement apparently out of nowhere. Of course, Bulgari's watchmaking department had been toiling away in the background since the 80s, in the early 2000s the brand acquired the independent watchmakers Daniel Roth and Gerald Genta's companies.

This growth allowed Bulgari to leverage the design and horological expertise of these two companies and combined it with its trademark Italian flair. As a result, Bulgari was able to create and manufacture the world's thinnest automatic movement, at just over 2mm thick.

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The Bulgari Octo Finissimo line of ultra thin watches began with the Octo Finissimo Tourbillon, which was at the time the world's thinnest tourbillon movement. Only two years later in 2016, the brand released the world's thinnest minute repeater.

Its next release, however, would be the one to propel the brand into the watchmaking mainstream. In 2017, the Octo Finissimo Automatic, then the world's thinnest automatic watch, was launched. While previous members of the collection were decidedly haute horlogerie (with a price tag to match), this watch retailed at a price that undercut other integrated bracelet watches while offering a genuinely horologically significant timepiece.

BVLGARI

Until very recently, most associated Bulgari solely with fine jewellery. Watchmaking seemed to be a distant second in the brand's list of interest - or it seemed, until the company released the world's thinnest automatic movement apparently out of nowhere. Of course, Bulgari's watchmaking department had been toiling away in the background since the 80s, in the early 2000s the brand acquired the independent watchmakers Daniel Roth and Gerald Genta's companies.

This growth allowed Bulgari to leverage the design and horological expertise of these two companies and combined it with its trademark Italian flair. As a result, Bulgari was able to create and manufacture the world's thinnest automatic movement, at just over 2mm thick.

As part of our commitment to transparency, we're showing you this watch on our timegrapher. Testing is done in six positions, covering how the watch is worn in daily use.

Timegraphers listen to the ticks which a movement make. Professional machines like ours can take more measurements, create a graph, and support more escapement types.

"Accuracy" refers to how many seconds a movement gains or loses each day. COSC standards require -4/+6 seconds a day, while vintage watches may read closer to -60/+60s.

"Amplitude" tells you how much the balance wheel is moving each rotation. Certain escapements have a higher amplitude, while some will have a lower value by default. A below-average reading for your watch's escapement suggests there is friction in the movement from a lack of lubrication.

"Beat error" is an indication of the alignment between the timekeeping components. In modern watches, a reading under to 1.0ms should be expected, while vintage watches may have a reading of up to 3.0ms.

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