Subdial Curated

Audemars Piguet Royal Oak Perpetual Calendar Rose Gold 26574OR.OO.1220OR.02

£139,950
The Perpetual Calendar is one of watchmaking's oldest challenges. Creating a watch that could account for all the days and months in a year was a feat that was achieved surprisingly early, back in the mid-1700s. The perpetual calendar's relationship with the Royal Oak dates back to the mid-80s. ... More

The Perpetual Calendar is one of watchmaking's oldest challenges. Creating a watch that could account for all the days and months in a year was a feat that was achieved surprisingly early, back in the mid-1700s.

The perpetual calendar's relationship with the Royal Oak dates back to the mid-80s. They were made possible by the calibre 2120/2800, introduced in 1978 and allowed the watch to remain relatively thin. These early references were extremely rare, however, with only 11 watches produced. Only in 1998 did the brand introduce a serially produced perpetual calendar. Since then, it's been a cornerstone of the Royal Oak collection, gaining nearly as much recognition as the iconic time-and-date version.

The story of Audemars Piguet is, in many ways, the story of the Royal Oak. Upon its release in 1972, it shocked observers across the industry with its high price tag and stainless steel construction. It was, however, unlike any other watch ever created. The integrated bracelet was given the same attention as the movement - something that was completely unheard of. The "petite tapisserie" dial was also a nod to traditional guilloche techniques, but rendered in a thoroughly modern form.

AUDEMARS PIGUET

Audemars Piguet was founded in Le Brassus in 1875, a rural part of Switzerland. The company became famous for making high complications, with the myriad complicated pocket watches in its museum being testament to its expertise. The company went from strength to strength, producing the world's first skeletonised wristwatch in 1934 and the world's first perpetual calendar wristwatch with a leap year indicator (allowing for user adjustment) in 1955.

By the late 1960s and early 70s, however, the company was beginning to lag behind in terms of innovations. To sidestep the atrophy that would go on to destroy so many other watchmakers, Audemars Piguet decided to do something bold and released the Royal Oak.

Costing 10 times more than a Rolex Submariner did, the watch was unashamedly luxurious. This watch spawned a new genre of watchmaking, and arguably saved not only Audemars Piguet, but the entire watch industry from a slow death.

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The Perpetual Calendar is one of watchmaking's oldest challenges. Creating a watch that could account for all the days and months in a year was a feat that was achieved surprisingly early, back in the mid-1700s.

The perpetual calendar's relationship with the Royal Oak dates back to the mid-80s. They were made possible by the calibre 2120/2800, introduced in 1978 and allowed the watch to remain relatively thin. These early references were extremely rare, however, with only 11 watches produced. Only in 1998 did the brand introduce a serially produced perpetual calendar. Since then, it's been a cornerstone of the Royal Oak collection, gaining nearly as much recognition as the iconic time-and-date version.

The story of Audemars Piguet is, in many ways, the story of the Royal Oak. Upon its release in 1972, it shocked observers across the industry with its high price tag and stainless steel construction. It was, however, unlike any other watch ever created. The integrated bracelet was given the same attention as the movement - something that was completely unheard of. The "petite tapisserie" dial was also a nod to traditional guilloche techniques, but rendered in a thoroughly modern form.

AUDEMARS PIGUET

Audemars Piguet was founded in Le Brassus in 1875, a rural part of Switzerland. The company became famous for making high complications, with the myriad complicated pocket watches in its museum being testament to its expertise. The company went from strength to strength, producing the world's first skeletonised wristwatch in 1934 and the world's first perpetual calendar wristwatch with a leap year indicator (allowing for user adjustment) in 1955.

By the late 1960s and early 70s, however, the company was beginning to lag behind in terms of innovations. To sidestep the atrophy that would go on to destroy so many other watchmakers, Audemars Piguet decided to do something bold and released the Royal Oak.

Costing 10 times more than a Rolex Submariner did, the watch was unashamedly luxurious. This watch spawned a new genre of watchmaking, and arguably saved not only Audemars Piguet, but the entire watch industry from a slow death.

As part of our commitment to transparency, we're showing you this watch on our timegrapher. Testing is done in six positions, covering how the watch is worn in daily use.

Timegraphers listen to the ticks which a movement make. Professional machines like ours can take more measurements, create a graph, and support more escapement types.

"Accuracy" refers to how many seconds a movement gains or loses each day. COSC standards require -4/+6 seconds a day, while vintage watches may read closer to -60/+60s.

"Amplitude" tells you how much the balance wheel is moving each rotation. Certain escapements have a higher amplitude, while some will have a lower value by default. A below-average reading for your watch's escapement suggests there is friction in the movement from a lack of lubrication.

"Beat error" is an indication of the alignment between the timekeeping components. In modern watches, a reading under to 1.0ms should be expected, while vintage watches may have a reading of up to 3.0ms.

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