Subdial Curated

Patek Philippe Perpetual Calendar Chronograph 5270P Salmon Dial

£185,000
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Salmon is perhaps the hottest dial colour in watchmaking today, and for good reason. It’s a balance of vintage styling while being subtle enough to work very well in a contemporary watch. This Patek Philippe Perpetual Calendar Chronograph in platinum is the perfect example of a modern salmon dial... More
Salmon is perhaps the hottest dial colour in watchmaking today, and for good reason. It’s a balance of vintage styling while being subtle enough to work very well in a contemporary watch. This Patek Philippe Perpetual Calendar Chronograph in platinum is the perfect example of a modern salmon dial, and shows us why they’re so beloved by watch collectors and enthusiasts worldwide. Less
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Salmon is perhaps the hottest dial colour in watchmaking today, and for good reason. It’s a balance of vintage styling while being subtle enough to work very well in a contemporary watch. This Patek Philippe Perpetual Calendar Chronograph in platinum is the perfect example of a modern salmon dial, and shows us why they’re so beloved by watch collectors and enthusiasts worldwide.
On the timegrapher

As part of our commitment to transparency, we're showing you this watch on our timegrapher. Testing is done in six positions, covering how the watch is worn in daily use.

Timegraphers listen to the ticks which a movement make. Professional machines like ours can take more measurements, create a graph, and support more escapement types.

"Accuracy" refers to how many seconds a movement gains or loses each day. COSC standards require -4/+6 seconds a day, while vintage watches may read closer to -60/+60s.

"Amplitude" tells you how much the balance wheel is moving each rotation. Certain escapements have a higher amplitude, while some will have a lower value by default. A below-average reading for your watch's escapement suggests there is friction in the movement from a lack of lubrication.

"Beat error" is, more simply, the difference between the "tick" and the "tock". In modern watches, a reading under to 1.0ms should be expected, while vintage watches may have a reading of up to 3.0ms.

In the press

"So not only is this new iteration of the 5270 platinum, it also features arguably one of the hottest dial treatments around today for high-end watches – a salmon colored dial – and instead of sticking with the traditional stick numerals, we have Arabic (not Breguet) numerals. The look is plain awesome..." HODINKEE, 2018

Read the full article at Hodinkee