Subdial Curated

Cartier Paris Collection Privée CPCP Monopoussoir White Gold 2396B Monopusher Chronograph

£45,375
&Free Insured Delivery
The Cartier Tortue Monopoussoir is perhaps the most celebrated of the Collection Privee, or CPCP, models. Taking inspiration from a watch made in the 1920s, it's classically Cartier with Roman numerals, a guilloche dial, and an eye-catching case shape. It's also powered by a very unusual movement... More

The Cartier Tortue Monopoussoir is perhaps the most celebrated of the Collection Privee, or CPCP, models. Taking inspiration from a watch made in the 1920s, it's classically Cartier with Roman numerals, a guilloche dial, and an eye-catching case shape.

It's also powered by a very unusual movement. Inside the watch ticks a monopusher chronograph calibre developed by THA Ebauche, the movement manufacture run at the time by future independent watchmaking titans FP Journe, Denis Flageollet (of De Bethune), and Vianney Halter.

CARTIER

Cartier comfortably sits at the intersection between fine watchmaking and art, combining years of heritage with eye-catching and unique case designs. From its inception in the turn of the 20th Century, Cartier has earned a well-deserved reputation for being a manufacture that has successfully transformed the humble wristwatch from a soldier's tool into a true object of desire.

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The Cartier Tortue Monopoussoir is perhaps the most celebrated of the Collection Privee, or CPCP, models. Taking inspiration from a watch made in the 1920s, it's classically Cartier with Roman numerals, a guilloche dial, and an eye-catching case shape.

It's also powered by a very unusual movement. Inside the watch ticks a monopusher chronograph calibre developed by THA Ebauche, the movement manufacture run at the time by future independent watchmaking titans FP Journe, Denis Flageollet (of De Bethune), and Vianney Halter.

CARTIER

Cartier comfortably sits at the intersection between fine watchmaking and art, combining years of heritage with eye-catching and unique case designs. From its inception in the turn of the 20th Century, Cartier has earned a well-deserved reputation for being a manufacture that has successfully transformed the humble wristwatch from a soldier's tool into a true object of desire.

As part of our commitment to transparency, we're showing you this watch on our timegrapher. Testing is done in six positions, covering how the watch is worn in daily use.

Timegraphers listen to the ticks which a movement make. Professional machines like ours can take more measurements, create a graph, and support more escapement types.

"Accuracy" refers to how many seconds a movement gains or loses each day. COSC standards require -4/+6 seconds a day, while vintage watches may read closer to -60/+60s.

"Amplitude" tells you how much the balance wheel is moving each rotation. Certain escapements have a higher amplitude, while some will have a lower value by default. A below-average reading for your watch's escapement suggests there is friction in the movement from a lack of lubrication.

"Beat error" is an indication of the alignment between the timekeeping components. In modern watches, a reading under to 1.0ms should be expected, while vintage watches may have a reading of up to 3.0ms.

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