Subdial Curated

Urwerk UR100 FireLeg

£57,500
&Free Insured Delivery
Urwerk's space-age UR-100 has its origins in a 17th Century clock created for the Vatican City. It's true - the wandering hours display originated in a Papal clock. While it sounds strange that such an avant-garde design would rely on such an antiquated technology, it's worth remembering the orig... More

Urwerk's space-age UR-100 has its origins in a 17th Century clock created for the Vatican City. It's true - the wandering hours display originated in a Papal clock. While it sounds strange that such an avant-garde design would rely on such an antiquated technology, it's worth remembering the original clock was conceived in the 1600s - the height of the Italian renaissance. Technology was moving in leaps and bounds, and it's only natural that a brand like Urwerk would draw inspiration from this period in history.

The watch itself is actually Urwerk's smallest and most wearable creation yet. In addition to the wandering hours, it also boasts a celestial hours complication. The red pointer at 2 o'clock measures the distance which the Earth travels around the sun, while the display at 10 o'clock shows how far Earth has rotated on its own axis every 20 minutes. Perhaps not the most useful of complications, but it's absolutely perfect for a manufacturer like Urwerk.

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Urwerk's space-age UR-100 has its origins in a 17th Century clock created for the Vatican City. It's true - the wandering hours display originated in a Papal clock. While it sounds strange that such an avant-garde design would rely on such an antiquated technology, it's worth remembering the original clock was conceived in the 1600s - the height of the Italian renaissance. Technology was moving in leaps and bounds, and it's only natural that a brand like Urwerk would draw inspiration from this period in history.

The watch itself is actually Urwerk's smallest and most wearable creation yet. In addition to the wandering hours, it also boasts a celestial hours complication. The red pointer at 2 o'clock measures the distance which the Earth travels around the sun, while the display at 10 o'clock shows how far Earth has rotated on its own axis every 20 minutes. Perhaps not the most useful of complications, but it's absolutely perfect for a manufacturer like Urwerk.

As part of our commitment to transparency, we're showing you this watch on our timegrapher. Testing is done in six positions, covering how the watch is worn in daily use.

Timegraphers listen to the ticks which a movement make. Professional machines like ours can take more measurements, create a graph, and support more escapement types.

"Accuracy" refers to how many seconds a movement gains or loses each day. COSC standards require -4/+6 seconds a day, while vintage watches may read closer to -60/+60s.

"Amplitude" tells you how much the balance wheel is moving each rotation. Certain escapements have a higher amplitude, while some will have a lower value by default. A below-average reading for your watch's escapement suggests there is friction in the movement from a lack of lubrication.

"Beat error" is an indication of the alignment between the timekeeping components. In modern watches, a reading under to 1.0ms should be expected, while vintage watches may have a reading of up to 3.0ms.